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Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

The Queen tells Prince Philip that she has received a 'Dear John' letter from PM John Key and that it 'seems the earth has moved for him back in NZ'. Text above reads 'Keynote'. In a second version the queen says that John Key 'preferred to stay at home 'cos the earth moved'. A third version refers to the decision of the PM to remain in New Zealand because of the Christchurch earthquake instead of going on a trip to Europe with his wife during which they were to have stayed at the invitation of the Queen at Balmoral Castle in Scotland. Quantity: 3 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

Maori Party MP for Te Tai Tonga, Rahui Katene' is buried up to her neck in earthquake rubble as she reads a newspaper headline referring to her statement that the aftermath of the earthquake has demonstrated 'racism and ethnic profiling'. Rahui Katene's head is disintegrating and two engineers who are examining the damage decide that 'This can't be repaired, it needs to be condemned'. Rahui Katene says the authorities, who kicked a Christchurch family out of a welfare centre that was set up after the Christchurch earthquake that struck on the 4th September, should apologise for judging them too early and shaming them publicly. Mrs Katene was also concerned about claims that Maori youth were being targeted by police. "I've heard from whanau that in one particular area rangatahi who were volunteering in their community and helping their whanau were accused by police of theft. The whanau are trying to work these issues through with the police, but I'm growing concerned about what appears to be ethnic profiling." Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

In the first of two frames which represents 'now' is a row of houses in the bay; two old-style character villas flank a modern house built to look like a boat and someone inside the modern house says proudly that they 'built here because of the character of the bays'. In the second frame which represents 'soon' all of the houses have taken on the character of the modern house and someone from the original modern house can't put their finger on why they feel that 'It's not the same somehow'. Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

Debbie says brightly that Christchurch has 'demonstrated the classic Kiwi quality of stoicism and behaving decently towards each other!' Jaimee replies that it's the same stoicism that means we complain a lot about our problems but never really do anything and Debbie tells her that applies just to her. Refers to the Christchurch earthquake of 4th September. Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

The cartoon shows rubble and ruined buildings after the Canterbury earthquake of 4th September 2010. Rats representing 'looters' run over the buildings taking advantage as do cockroaches representing 'politics'. Refers to a certain amount of looting but also the high profiles during the aftermath of Mayor Bob Parker with local body elections only a few weeks away and PM John Key in particular. Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

The cartoon shows a family standing proudly in front of their tent which has 'No leaks!', is 'Earthquake-proof!', and 'Affordable!' An 'Optional extra' is an 'inflatable base for tsunami-prone areas'. Text below reads 'Not suitable for volcanic areas. Refers to the problems that have been experienced in the last couple of decades with leaky homes because of slack building codes (which have now been tightened), refers also to the Canterbury earthquake of 4th September with its aftermath of rebuilding for greater earthquake proofing and lastly refers to the problem of people being unable to afford houses. Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

A weather map of New Zealand is shown beset with dreadful weather conditions that include cyclones and lightning strikes; there is also earthquake activity round the Canterbury region. Text reads 'Mother Nature's wild child... but who's the father?' Refers to the Canterbury earthquake of 4th September 2010 and the spring storms with wind, rain and snow in recent weeks. Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

It is the middle of the night and a man wearing his dressing-gown runs out of his house towards a portaloo clutching a toilet roll and saying 'Try me'. The neighbourhood is wrecked by earthquakes. On the ground is a newspaper with a headline that reads 'New Delhi athletes substandard accomodation facilities'. A second newspaper reads 'Given the choice many prefer to stay home'. Context: The first Christchurch earthquake shook the city on early morning of the 4th September 2010. The destruction of sewage infrastructure has meant portaloos and long-drops have become de rigeur as a consequence. There was a desperate rush to get the village ready for the influx of athletes before the opening of the Commonwealth Games on 3rd October 2010 and there was a fear that unsatisfactory sanitation systems might cause health and safety problems. Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

Refers to the government's earthquake response legislation and the Rugby World Cup 2011 (Empowering) Bill. 26 experts in constitutional law from all six of the country's law faculties have penned a letter condemning the Government's earthquake response legislation. No sooner was their work in the public eye than the similarly flawed Rugby World Cup 2011 (Empowering) Bill was reported back from a select committee, with a recommendation that it pass. It also goes far beyond what is required to get things done. In bypassing the normal consent process, the bill says the authority does not have to hold hearings on applications and that its decisions can be challenged in the High Court only on points of law. Effectively, the legislation asks New Zealanders to accept that the Rugby World Cup Minister knows best. It is he who knows how the event must be run. Precisely the same attitude pervades the Canterbury Earthquake Response and Recovery Act. This hands individual Government ministers the power to change almost every law, thereby handing Parliament's normal law-making role to the Executive. Their decisions cannot be challenged in any court'. (NZ Herald editorial - 1 October 2010) Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

An official at the 'Otago Port Co.' stares in bewilderment at the feet of his colleague at the Lyttelton Port Company who says 'Ah, that might do it for now' as he hangs upside down by his feet from his upturned desk in the aftermath of the 4th September Canterbury earthquake. Text above reads 'News, the Lyttelton Port Co. has halted merger talks with Otago since the 'quake, saying "the landscape has changed". Refers to the news that Lyttelton Port, the South Island's biggest port, abandoned two-years of merger talks with rival Port Otago because it is preoccupied with rebuilding after the Canterbury earthquake. Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

The cartoon shows a platter of 'Brownbait patties $2 per kilo'. In the background is a 'contaminated' river. Refers to the contamination of Canterbury's waterways after the earthquake of 4th September which resulted in sewage pipes being damaged thus contaminating the rivers. This means that people should not be attempting to catch whitebait in these rivers during the annual whitebait season which is open between 15 August and 30 November. Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

The small crane on the back of a rubbish truck has picked up a whole portaloo and dumped its contents (a man with his pants around his ankles) into the rubbish. The driver tells the crane operator that he should have emptied 'the bin! ... Not the portaloo!'. A streetsign reads 'Avonside'. Refers to the use of portaloos in parts of Christchurch since the earthquake of 4th September because of damage to plumbing infrastructure. Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

The cartoon shows the name 'Christchurch' shaking so that bits fly off it; the letters 'H', 'I', and 'T' spelling 'hit' are the only ones not shaking. A second version has the words 'Rock'n Roll' as a title. Refers to the earthquake of 4th September 2010 and its hundreds of aftershocks which continue on now into November. Two versions of this cartoon are available Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

'Cappuccino dreams'. Christchurch mayoral candidates Jim Anderton and incumbent mayor Bob Parker tell constituents that they will get respectively more transparency in 'financial dealings' and in 't-shirts'. As the earthquake strikes they continue their electioneering until they are told to 'clear orf' because 'these frames lack substance'. A front-end loader begins to dismantle the structure from which they are speaking. Refers to the local body elections to take place 9th October and the Canterbury earthquake of 4th September. Published in the Presto Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

A very large woman stands wedged between two rows of concrete pillars eating a huge cream bun. She says 'Christmas fare protection... it helps prevent lateral spread!' Context - overeating at Christmas and lateral spreading, which is associated with liquefaction and tends to occur near streams and waterways as the soil mass moves towards them. Reference to the Christchurch earthquake of 4th September 2010. Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

The cartoon's title is 'Life in the South Island'. A man wonders aloud to his wife when the 'plague of locusts' will arrive as they have had 'collapsing finance companies, earthquakes' and 'heavy snow damage'. Refers to the collapse of South Canterbury Finance, the earthquake of 4th September, and more recently, heavy snow in Southland that has caused roofs to collapse. Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

Shows a graph illustrating the 'Growth forecast' for the economy. A large finger representing the 'Reserve Bank' squashes the growth arrow as though it is a fly and it starts to zig-zag crazily downwards. The statement made 16th September looked a shadow of the bright one the Reserve Bank published three months ago. With its forecasts finalised the day before the Canterbury earthquake struck, the Bank has taken secateurs to its economic growth track, and a carving knife to its interest rate path. Instead of GDP growth pushing 4% this year and next, for example, it now struggles to reach 3% in each. It's tempting to think this has been driven by the wobbling international news over recent months. In fact it's been because of a suddenly sombre view around NZ consumer spending and the housing market. (Interest.co.nz) Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

Homeless earthquake victims arrive in Hobbiton with their bags when it seems that New Zealand is going to lose The Hobbit to another country. Refers to the dispute between Warner Brothers, represented by Peter Jackson, and NZ Actors Equity over a union demand for negotiations over the terms and conditions offered in the contracts for actors and others working on the film very nearly caused the film to be made somewhere else. The battle, which was eventually resolved successfully after meetings between PM John Key and Warner Brothers representatives, divided New Zealanders. Refers also to the Canterbury earthquake of 4th September and its aftershocks that have left many houses uninhabitable. Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

New PM of Australia Julia Gillard stands on top of a house of cards that looks extremely unstable. She says 'As newly elected PM of Australia I promise all cards on the table'. Below are the words 'NZ not the only shaky country..' Refers to the recent closely-contested and 'most-extraordinary Australian election in decades' which has been won by Labour's Julia Gillard. The negotiating for a new government by Julia Gillard against her Liberal rival Tony Abbott took 17 days, with Julia Gillard, in the end, able to cobble together a government with the support of independents Tony Windsor and Rob Oakeshott as well as the Greens plus a long list of promises. Critics see her coalition as dysfunctional. The text below refers to the Canterbury earthquake of 4th September 2010. Quantity: 2 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

Two people stare at a demolition scene. The man thinks there must have been an earthquake but the woman advises him that it was the city council. Refers to plans to demolish three buildings in Wellington's Willis Street without public consultation. The buildings due for demolition are owned by Singaporean Grand Complex Properties, which plans eventually to build a multimillion-dollar high-rise on the site, reports stuff.co.nz. The Canterbury earthquake happened 4th September and as a result there has been a lot of discussion about the need to preserve historic buildings if at all possible. Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

A man and woman clutch each other in terror as their house rocks in an aftershake; the man grabs his phone and offers his land for sale adding that 'foreigners are welcome'. Refers to the Canterbury earthquake of 4th September 2010 which continues to experience aftershakes, some of them quite significant. Refers also to the debate about whether New Zealand should be selling land, particularly farms, to foreigners; one side of the debate considers the sale of land to foreigners to make economic sense while others feel that our heritage is being lost. Both colour and black and white versions of this cartoon are available Quantity: 2 digital cartoon(s).