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Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

PM John Key sits at a large desk in a very large chair looking disconcerted as a messenger says 'after your display in the charity match - John Wright wants you on standby for India. Context - The charity match for Christchurch played at the Basin reserve on Sunday 9 March 2011. The prime minister played along with actors Russell Crowe and James Nesbitt, who were opposing coaches with the match being refereed by Ian McKellen in Sunday's match starting at 4pm. Key will face an over from the Australian spin king during the innings break at the Basin, which Cricket Wellington expects could sell out as early as today. Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

Prime Minister John Key sits at his desk on which are two baskets; the first is labelled 'Great news' and contains a very few documents and the second which is labelled 'Disasters' is so laden that it is causing the desk to crack. Context: New Zealand seems to be beset with disasters: the earthquakes in Christchurch, the 'Rena' shipwreck and consequeny oilspill etc. Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

A crowd of rather sad people queue for jobs and work at the Christchurch rebuild; all around them are signs that read 'Pike River', 'leaky buildings', 'Chch quake rebuild', 'EQC levy hike', '200,000 children in poverty', 'food prices up', 'deficit', and 'GST hike'. Prime Minister John Key in the centre of the crowd yells 'Hey everyone - look up there!' as he kicks a rugby ball into the sky. Context: John Key attempts to divert the attention of people from New Zealand's current woes. Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

A policeman stops a queue of politicians at a checkpoint in Christchurch saying 'Sorry, no politics past this point'. In the queue are Prime Minister John Key, Minister of Finance Bill English carrying a ledger, leader of ACT Rodney Hide wearing his yellow jacket and carrying an axe and a saw and lastly leader of the Labour Party Phil Goff. Context - the Christchurch earthquake of 22 February 2011 and the danger of political point-scoring rather than serious co-operative work to rebuild Christchurch. Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

In six small cameos Prime Minister John Key ponders over things economic and ends up dancing; he says 'I'm bereft of ideas for the economy gambling the lives of our troops in the Afghanistan mess I'm presiding over the biggest budget deficit in our history borrowing $300m a week to cushion our slide into oblivion Using lots of World Cup piffle to distract from the real issues Yet I'm still rating miles higher than Goff so how hopeless is he??? A little man in the last frame comments 'Spoiled for choice eh?' Context - New Zealand's rather dire economic situation made so much worse by the Christchurch earthquakes of 4 September 2010 and 22 February 2011, the consistently high poll rating of John Key and the series of disasters suffered by the Labour Party in the run up to the 2011 election in November. Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

Text below the image reads 'More silence?..' Prime Minister John Key and the Governor General Sir Anand Satyanand and several 'hangers-on' almost suffer coronaries when an official suggests in discussions about 'cost-saving ideas' that 'One of the National Projects we could "reprioritise" in the wake of the earthquake is to axe any Kiwi VIP attendance at the royal wedding'. Context - The PM and Governor General are thought to be on the list for invitations to the wedding of Prince William and Kate Middleton but after the catastrophic Christchurch earthquake of 22 February 2011, which is going to cost the country billions, a wag wonders whether they should go. Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

The cartoon shows the name in large capital letters 'Christchurch' with the 't' drawn as the Christian cross symbol. Below is text reading '"These deaths are our greatest loss. They remind us that buildings are just buildings, roads just roads, but people are irreplaceable" John Key' Context - The very severe Christchurch earthquake of 22 February 2011 in which probably more than 200 people died. Two versions of this cartoon are available Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

Prime Minister John Key drives a tractor to which is attached a crane and a huge demolition ball in the shape of MP Gerry Brownlee's head; the ball smashes against a historic building bringing stone pediments down. Context - Gerry Brownlee, who is Earthquake Recovery Minister, has caused a stir by suggesting that if he had his way some of Christchurch's older buildings would be "down tomorrow". He also said the price of saving some historic buildings badly damaged in the February 22 earthquake was too high. People had died in the quake because of attempts to save historic buildings badly damaged in the September 4 quake. Brownlee said he had no regrets despite the stir his comments caused - but he was annoyed by suggestions the Cathedral and Riccarton House were among buildings he thought should be bowled. He believed those buildings should be saved, and they would be. "I'm not a philistine; I was chairman of the trust that actually saved Riccarton House from the bulldozers in 1990. "I understand conservation architecture very well and I do have an appreciation of heritage buildings." Original cartoon held at A-474-048 Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

Shows John Key phoning Canterbury Earthquake Recovery Minister Gerry Brownlee during his recent visit to China. Key tells Gerry he has found an architect friend in China who can design the new Christchurch Cathedral. Wider context refers to the debate over the 3 plans recently released for the Cathedral, but also refers to media debate concerning Key's involvement in instances of preferential appointments - in particular, his claim to have forgotten a phone call to his friend Ian Fletcher in which Key suggested Fletcher should apply to become director of the Government Communications Security Bureau. See Stuff, 3 April 2013. Colour and black and white versions available Quantity: 2 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

Prime Minister John Key sits on a huge crushing ball that represents the 'IRB' (International Rugby Board) and says 'Don't listen to rumour. It's not a fait accompli yet!' The ball swings towards crumbling land which represents 'Christchurch World Cup Rights'. Context - The Government has repeatedly said its preference is to keep cup games in Christchurch and Mr Key said yesterday that it would send a "powerful message" about Christchurch, although the Government had to be realistic. "The IRB are the ultimate arbiter ... they hold their own insurance policies and they'll have their own discussions with their insurers. There's only so far New Zealand can take this." (Stuff 12 March 2011) Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

Shows Minister for Christchurch Earthquake Recovery Gerry Brownlee delighted with his plan to rebuild Christchurch and to have it paid for buy the PM's casino. Context: Refers to the Christchurch Central Development Unit that Minister for Christchurch Earthquake Recovery Gerry Brownlee has put in place. Refers also to the very controversial deal that Prime Minister John Key has made with Auckland's SkyCity to the effect that SkyCity will pay the full construction cost of a new convention centre - estimated at $350 million, in return for being allowed to add more gaming tables and machines, and extending its licence beyond 2021. Colour and black and white versions of this cartoon are available Quantity: 2 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

Minister for Social Development Paula Bennett stands on a large carpet that represents the 'dole'; she has swept the detritus of 'job initiatives', 'unemployment' and 'job summit' under the carpet with a broom and says 'The benefit system is there and can sort of get as big as it needs to' Context - the Government has announced its business assistance package to Christchurch is to be watered down and then cease over the next few weeks. John Key and Paula Bennett have said that 'the dole will be there for them'. Clayton Cosgrove Labour's Canterbury Earthquake Recovery spokesperson says Prime Minister John Key and Social Development Minister Paula Bennett are cruelly missing the point in terms of Canterbury people who lose their jobs in the wake of the earthquakes. He says "They want jobs, and they want to know what the Government is going to do about ensuring Christchurch businesses can get up and running again". (Business Scoop 5 April 2011) Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

Text reads 'If a secret microphone was smuggled into CERA's meetings?...' A group of CERA staff chat during tea at a meeting. They make unguarded comments about the state of affairs in earthquake-stricken Christchurch unaware that a microphone has been left in a sugarbowl. Context: the cartoon suggests that there seems to many Christchurch people to be a lack of real care on the part of officialdom as they struggle to recover from the earthquake damage. The microphone recalls that left 'accidentally' on a table at which Prime Minister John Key and the ACT candidate for the Epsom seat were having a highly publicised cup of tea. Then when it was discovered that a microphone had recorded their conversation John Key tried to get a court order to supress making it public. Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

The cartoon shows rubble and ruined buildings after the Canterbury earthquake of 4th September 2010. Rats representing 'looters' run over the buildings taking advantage as do cockroaches representing 'politics'. Refers to a certain amount of looting but also the high profiles during the aftermath of Mayor Bob Parker with local body elections only a few weeks away and PM John Key in particular. Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

The Queen tells Prince Philip that she has received a 'Dear John' letter from PM John Key and that it 'seems the earth has moved for him back in NZ'. Text above reads 'Keynote'. In a second version the queen says that John Key 'preferred to stay at home 'cos the earth moved'. A third version refers to the decision of the PM to remain in New Zealand because of the Christchurch earthquake instead of going on a trip to Europe with his wife during which they were to have stayed at the invitation of the Queen at Balmoral Castle in Scotland. Quantity: 3 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

The cartoon is entitled 'seismic upheaval'. Prime Minister John Key and Finance Minister Bill English stand near great seismic cracks in the ground and stare sadly at a huge wallet, 'Bill's boodle', belonging to Bill English. Vast quantities of banknotes spill out of the cash pocket in the wallet which also contains a 'travel card', a 'house card' and an 'expenses card'. The various cards in the wallet refer to expense account embarrassments relating to Bill English. Etched in the ground are the words 'Christchurch quake' and 'South Canterbury Finance'. The cartoon refers to two major events in the Canterbury area in recent times that have incurred huge government costs; these are the collapse of the South Canterbury Finance Company and the earthquake that struck early Saturday morning 4th September. The South Canterbury Finance Company has been taken into receivership by the government which has guaranteed that all 30,000 fortunate high-risk investors will be paid out $1.6b thanks to the taxpayer. Treasury is assuming that the cost of the earthquake will reach $4 billion, including $2 billion worth of estimated damage to private dwellings and their contents, $1 billion of damage to commercial property, and $1 billion worth of damage to public infrastructure. Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

Two skeletal people sit in armchairs waist-deep in silt. The man is reading the newspaper and says 'The wait's over! The Land Report's due out dear!... DEAR?' He realises that his wife, whose bony hand clutches 'EQC update No. 37', is dead. Context - On Thursday 23 June Prime Minister John Key, Canterbury Earthquake Recovery Minister Gerry Brownlee and representatives from engineering consultants Tonkin & Taylor announced the first part of the Government's long-awaited land report that revealed the fate of up to 5000 quake-damaged homes. Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

Surrounded by mud and puddles in Christchurch Prime Minister John Key puts his arm round co-leader of the Maori Party Pita Sharples and smiles happily; behind them is a brand new plastic portaloo. On the ground lies a newspaper with a headline that reads 'Govt. to fund $2m giant RWC plastic waka'. Pita Sharples says 'and to show we're not neglecting our priorities in these austere times, Christchurch will get a new plastic portaloo!' Context - The government has hit back at criticism over a $2 million venue centre in the shape of a waka for the Rugby World Cup (RWC), defending the cost as necessary to host a world-class event. Co-leader of the Maori Party Pita Sharples says the waka will promote Maori culture during the Rugby World Cup and at other events (like the America's Cup). Labour Party MP Shane Jones asks "How can Dr Sharples and Prime Minister John Key actually believe that this expensive indulgence is a positive advertisement for Maori? The truth is they don't but they're both working together in a desperate effort to keep the Maori Party afloat. Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

Two people crawl across a desert littered with animal bones and skulls towards the words 'Land reports' in the distance. The woman says 'Don't get your hopes up! It's probably a mirage!' Context - On Thursday 23 June Prime Minister John Key, Canterbury Earthquake Recovery Minister Gerry Brownlee and representatives from engineering consultants Tonkin & Taylor announced the first part of the Government's long-awaited land report that revealed the fate of up to 5000 quake-damaged homes. Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

In the foreground PM John Key drives a bulldozer over Christchurch; in the background two engineers read a newspaper report that says 'P.M. gives false demolition number, PM gives false World Cup hope' and one of them says 'Now I know why those things are called BULLdozers..' Context - Prime Minister John Key is sticking to a government estimate that 10,000 Christchurch homes will need to be razed despite criticism that he should wait for official figures; he also stated that 100,000 homes may need repairs, despite Civil Defence saying it has only checked 70,000 homes so far. John Key was also insisting that there was a chance of keeping World Cup rugby games in Christchurch but an official announcement on 16 March dashed those hopes. Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

A worried Hekia Parata, Minister of Education, tells John Key, the Prime Minister, that schools in Canterbury are resisting being merged. John Key replies that the government will go through a 'consultation process' and then 'do what we like'. However the schools are claiming marae status and thus protection under the Treaty of Waitangi. The 'Hui report' which the Prime Minister is holding confirms this fear. The Ministry of Education, given the excuse of the Canterbury earthquakes, announced that many schools there will be merged or closed. Threatened schools, particularly the two Maori language schools, lodged complaints with the Waitangi Tribunal. 'Hui reports' refers to the claims and resulting hui over the water rights of the proposed partial privatisation of state assets. Colour and black and white versions available Quantity: 2 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

Homeless earthquake victims arrive in Hobbiton with their bags when it seems that New Zealand is going to lose The Hobbit to another country. Refers to the dispute between Warner Brothers, represented by Peter Jackson, and NZ Actors Equity over a union demand for negotiations over the terms and conditions offered in the contracts for actors and others working on the film very nearly caused the film to be made somewhere else. The battle, which was eventually resolved successfully after meetings between PM John Key and Warner Brothers representatives, divided New Zealanders. Refers also to the Canterbury earthquake of 4th September and its aftershocks that have left many houses uninhabitable. Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

The cartoon shows Prime Minister John Key as a surgeon in a blood-spattered white coat; he has just created a Frankenstein monster which has resulted in the Minister for Earthquake Recovery Gerry Brownlee and Mayor of Christchurch Bob Parker joined together in a single body named 'CERA". Gerry Brownlee clutches a huge spiked mallet and Bob Parker a paintbrush. Context - a new bill is being rushed through parliament to establish the Canterbury Earthquake Recovery Authority (Cera); it empowers it to lead reconstruction efforts in Christchurch. It gives Cera specific powers to get information from any source, to requisition and build on land and to carry out demolitions. It can also take over local authorities if they are not working effectively on recovery work. The monster suggests distinctly differing philosophies on how the work of rebuilding Christchurch should proceed. Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

In the top frame someone unseen (Murray McCully) in the Beehive says 'John! - There's been a bad reaction to us taking special powers to fix problems in Auckland!' Prime Minister John Key says 'What Murray?' In the lower frame Minister for the Rugby World Cup, Murray McCully, says 'The worst hit parts of Christchurch have declared themselves Fan Zones!' and the PM says 'Oh S..t!' The little Evans man says 'Sounds better than Red Zone!' Context: Refers to the chaos over transport and crowd control in the fanzone when much larger numbers of people flocked to the Rugby World Cup opening and revelry than expected. The government used special powers to take over the management of Queens Wharf fanzone spaces previously managed by an Auckland Council group, thus rather undermining the Mayor, Len Brown and the Auckland City Council. A new plan was signed off under special powers by Murray McCully directly after the fiasco. The Christchurch comment refers to the areas worst hit by the earhquakes. Colour and black and white versions available Quantity: 2 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

The New Zealand public contemplate a dead drought stricken landscape. As well as lack of water, there is a lack of moderate pay scales for CEOs, satisfaction with EQC, quality TV, generous insurance companies, brilliant Solid Energy management, the integrity of John Banks (and by implication that of other MPs), quality education ministers, worthwhile overseas trips by the Prime Minister, 'clever' NZ First MPs and a boost for the West Coast among others. Considered from a Canterbury perspective, the drought of early 2013 becomes a symbol for many of the recent political and social ailments afflicting the land. Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

The cartoon shows the Minister for Earthquake Recovery, Gerry Brownlee, who wears a jacket with 'CERA' printed on it, reading from the 'Doomsday Book'. He reads 'The following suburbs and my hopes of a reputation as an effective minister, are now officially listed as munted...' Context - On 23rd June Prime Minister, John Key, officially announced which streets and suburbs in earthquake-ravaged Christchurch would be abandoned. For many residents, there has been too much delay and too little information regarding progress towards resolving questions about which land can or cannot be used for rebuilding for Gerry Brownlee's reputation to remain unsullied. Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

Prime Minister John Key stands grinning on a cracked pedestal bearing the words 'Most popular P.M.' In the background is the Beehive flying a skull and crossbones flag. The landscape is a desert with cactus and dried bones and a vulture in a bare tree. A man and a woman comment that it looks as though the quake may have done damage in Wellington after all, that and the crash of the SCF fund. Refers to two major events in the Canterbury area in recent times that have incurred huge government costs; these are the collapse of the South Canterbury Finance Company and the earthquake that struck early Saturday morning 4th September. The South Canterbury Finance Company has been taken into receivership by the government which has guaranteed that all 30,000 fortunate high-risk investors will be paid out $1.6b thanks to the taxpayer. Treasury is assuming that the cost of the earthquake will reach $4 billion, including $2 billion worth of estimated damage to private dwellings and their contents, $1 billion of damage to commercial property, and $1 billion worth of damage to public infrastructure. There is a colour and a black and white version of this cartoon Quantity: 2 digital cartoon(s).