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Images, eqnz.chch.2010

The Cathedral of the Blessed Sacrament, Christcurch, after the 6.3 magnitude quake on 22 February 2011. When The Angels Fall Take your father's cross Gently from the wall A shadow still remaining See the churches fall In mighty arcs of sound And all that they're containing Yet all the rugged souls Looking for their lost homes Shuffle to...

Videos, NZ On Screen

This 1974 end of year special for music show Popco features cover songs performed in the studio and around Christchurch. Presenting and singing are Rob Guest (before musicals fame), Steve Gilpin (before he founded Mi-Sex) and Hayden Wood. Joining them are Space Waltz (in their glam rock glory), Annie Whittle (on the banks of the Avon), show regulars the Maggie Burke Dancers in Cathedral Square, Mark Williams (sparkling in green lurex), Bunny Walters and Claire Raine, Rockinghorse (featuring 'Nature' composer Wayne Mason), Drut (complete with flaming guitar) and Beaver (in the finale).

Images, UC QuakeStudies

A photograph of Mike Hewson's installation, 'Government Life Suspension', on the wall of the Chancery Arcade building. The artwork depicts a reflection of the Government Life building which is visible behind the Chancery Arcade. The installation is part of a series titled 'Homage to the Lost Spaces'. The Government Life and Chancery Arcade buildings were demolished in 2014.

Images, UC QuakeStudies

A photograph of Mike Hewson's installation, 'Government Life Suspension', on the wall of the Chancery Arcade building. The artwork depicts a reflection of the Government Life building which is visible behind the Chancery Arcade. The installation is part of a series titled 'Homage to the Lost Spaces'. The Government Life and Chancery Arcade buildings were demolished in 2014.

Images, UC QuakeStudies

A photograph of a veterinarian and SPCA Field Officer preparing a pigeon before the two minutes of silence held in respect for those who lost their lives in the 22 February 2011 earthquake. The pigeon was to be released as a symbol of love, hope and renewal after the two minutes of silence. It was found amongst the rubble and debris of the ChristChurch Cathedral and named Barney Rubble.

Images, UC QuakeStudies

A photograph of Mike Hewson's installation, 'Government Life Suspension', on the wall of the Chancery Arcade building. The artwork depicts a reflection of the Government Life building which is visible behind the Chancery Arcade. The installation is part of a series titled 'Homage to the Lost Spaces'. The Government Life and Chancery Arcade buildings were demolished in 2014.

Images, UC QuakeStudies

A photograph of Mike Hewson's installation, 'Government Life Suspension', on the wall of the Chancery Arcade building. The artwork depicts a reflection of the Government Life building which is visible behind the Chancery Arcade. The installation is part of a series titled 'Homage to the Lost Spaces'. The Government Life and Chancery Arcade buildings were demolished in 2014.

Images, UC QuakeStudies

A photograph of Mike Hewson's installation, 'Government Life Suspension', on the wall of the Chancery Arcade building. The artwork depicts a reflection of the Government Life building which is visible behind the Chancery Arcade. The installation is part of a series titled 'Homage to the Lost Spaces'. The Government Life and Chancery Arcade buildings were demolished in 2014.

Audio, Radio New Zealand

Little is known about The Wizard of New Zealand who took centre stage in Christchurch's Cathedral Square from the 70s until the Christchurch earthquakes in 2011, which saw the city in a state of disrepair. A man who challenged political, social and cultural ideology, The Wizard posed provocative questions in this public space, much to the delight, and sometimes dismay, of passersby. But the background to why The Wizard was there in the first place has been something of a mystery... until now. Sonia Yee finds out more in this episode of Eyewitness.

Audio, Radio New Zealand

Instead of concentrating on the buildings destroyed in and after the earthquakes in Christchurch's CBD, a new event is enticing people back to explore the heritage buildings that have survived. A new organisation, Te Putahi, is behind the Open Christchurch programme that celebrates the city's surviving architecture, starting with inner-city schools throwing open their doors to the public. Architectural historian and co-founder of Te Putahi, Dr Jessica Halliday tells Lynn Freeman they hope to encourage discussion around well-designed spaces and their impacts on peoples' lives. Open Christchurch starts next Sunday with a tour of The Cathedral Grammar Junior School.

Audio, Radio New Zealand

Academics have done some number crunching and decided where 10, 000 words sit on a happiness index. What the Panelists Tim Watkin and Selwyn Manning have been thinking about. Ros Rowe of the Leg Up Trust talks about funding cuts which are affecting her horse therapy business which helps disadvantaged young people. The Cathedral has been in a state of limbo since the Christchurch earthquakes. Now roosting pigeons are adding to the damage. Are you keen on the Pokemon Go craze? Pakistani social media celebrity Qandeel Baloch has been killed by her brother in a so-called honour killing.

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

Text above the image reads 'Time capsules unearthed in Christchurch' A man reads a newspaper which says 'Petrol is so cheap you can actually afford to run one of these new-fangled motor cars...' Context - when a bronze statue of Christchurch founder John Robert Godley, which stood in Cathedral Square, toppled during the Christchurch earthquake of 22 February 2011, a crane driver clearing rubble discovered two time capsules. One is a small glass capsule with a hand-written letter on gold parchment inside, while the other is a large metal-like object, yet to be opened. A Nelson newspaper 'The Colonist' in an article published in 1918, about the time capsule in Christchurch said, "This statute of John Robert Godley executed by Thomas Woolner was erected in the west side of the Cathedral Square by the Provincial Government of Canterbury, and unveiled by the late Sir Charles Christopher Bowen on August 6 1867, it was moved to this site in March 1918." The man in the cartoon reads a bout the cost of petrol being incredibly cheap and thinks it refers to today's prices. Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

The title reads 'Greener square for Christchurch?..' The cartoon depicts the city centre in Christchurch entirely covered with green and there are cows wandering by the stream as well as grazing on the tops of buildings. A man at the top of the green cathedral says 'I can see it really growing on me!' Context: This is a reference to the draft Central City plan under which the Central City will be greener and more attractive. Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Audio, Radio New Zealand

Topics - scientists are wondering how the light gets out. Maybe there is a cosmic crack in everything, because in the Journal Astrophysical Letters it is noted that there is a huge deficit of light in the universe. Owners of heritage apartments in Auckland face becoming "impoverished" according to a high-profile real estate figure, because of new laws around earthquake strengthening. Martin Dunn of City Sales says the Building Amendment Bill is "overkill". He says those trying to sell heritage apartments are having a difficult time because of the new rules. Jim Anderton, has again raised the issue of whether the Christchurch Cathedral has to come down.

Videos, NZ On Screen

This booster's gem was produced by the NFU to mark Canterbury's centennial. The original Canterbury crusaders' dream of a model England colony is shown in settler life re-enactments. The importance of meat and wheat to the region's prosperity is extolled and a progressive narrative — "in one brief century they've turned the wilderness into fertile farms and built their red-roofed homes" — underpins contemporary scenes (cricket, church) and much bucolic (plains, alps) scenery. Trivia: Peter Jackson used an excerpt from the film to open Heavenly Creatures.

Research papers, Victoria University of Wellington

Construction and Demolition (C&D) waste contributes to over 50% of New Zealand’s overall waste. Materials such as timber, plasterboard, and concrete make up 81% of the C&D waste that goes into landfills each year. Alongside this, more than 235 heritage-listed buildings have been demolished in Christchurch since the 2011 earthquakes. This research portfolio aims to find a solution to decrease C&D waste produced by demolishing heritage buildings. With the recent announcement of The Cathedral of the Blessed Sacrament’s demolition, this will be another building added to the list of lost heritage in Christchurch. This research portfolio aims to bridge the relationship between heritage and waste through the recycling and reuse of the demolished materials, exploring the idea that history and heritage are preserved through building material reuse. This research portfolio mainly focuses on reducing construction and demolition waste in New Zealand, using the design of a new Catholic Cathedral as a vessel. This thesis will challenge how the construction and design industry deals with the demolition of heritage buildings and their contribution to New Zealand’s waste. It aims to explore the idea of building material reuse not only to reduce waste but also to retain the history and heritage of the demolished building within the materials.

Audio, Radio New Zealand

UAVs or Unmanned Aerial Vehicles, or drones as they’re commonly known, are suddenly everywhere. Conservationists and academics are using them to map our rivers; engineers surveyed the interior of the earthquake damaged Christchurch Cathedral with one; and then, of course, there's the military drones used to such lethal affect in Pakistan and Yemen. Ideas visits Palmerston North's Skycam UAV – New Zealand's leading manufacture of UAVs; talks to the interim president of the Association of Unmanned Operations – a union of US drone pilots; and Professor James Cavallaro tells us about the findings of a report he co-authored: 'Living Under Drones: Death, Injury, and Trauma to Civilians from US Drone Practices in Pakistan'.

Videos, UC QuakeStudies

A video about businesses in the Christchurch central city Red Zone. The Red Zone has now been renamed the Rebuild Zone. The video shows businesses which have remained untouched since the 22 February 2011 earthquake, including the Camelot Hotel and the i-SITE visitor centre in Cathedral Square, Subway on High Street, Jeans West on High Street, Time Zone on Colombo Street, Comics Compulsion on Manchester Street, Mortgage Solutions mortgage brokers on the corner of Hereford and Manchester Streets, Pocha Bar and Restaurant off Lichfield Street, and a fabric store on Lichfield Street.

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

A man with his arm around his wife and baby stands on a heap of rubble with a spade in his other hand. In the background are the Christchurch Cathedral and several other badly damaged buildings and a signpost reading 'Christchurch' lies on top of the rubble. Text reads 'Buildings may fall but the Kiwi spirit and compassion for our neighbours will never be crushed...' There are two versions of the cartoon, one in colour and one black and white. Refers to the Christchurch earthquake of 4th September 2010. Quantity: 2 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

The cartoon, which looks like a woodcut depicts a muscled workman wearing a black singlet; his arms are folded and the fingers of one hand are crossed. On his arms are tattoos of a helmet and pick, a '$' symbol, a petrol pump, and a high magnitude earthquake graph. Behind him are buildings, including the Christchurch Cathedral, damaged following the Christchurch earthquake of 22 February 2011. Below the cartoon are the words 'Apologies to Nigel Brown' - a black singlet is a recurring motif in the work of New Zealand artist Nigel Brown. Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Images, UC QuakeStudies

An aerial photograph of the Christchurch central city. The photograph has been captioned by BeckerFraserPhotos, "This photograph shows nearly all of the CBD. The two streets which are prominent in this photograph are Manchester Street on the left and Colombo Street on the right of the photograph. This photograph is from the north, looking towards the southern part of the city. Cathedral Square is about half way up, towards the right. It shows the extent of demolition that has happened already close to the river and near the Manchester/Gloucester Street intersection where there is a lot of bare land surrounding Radio Network House".

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

The cartoon shows the word 'survivors' in very large print which fades out towards the end of the word. A second version is the same as the first but has the text 'Search called off' in the top left corner. A third version shows the word 'survivors' against a background of the ruined Christchurch Cathedral. Context - The moment when it was realized that no more people could have survived the Christchurch of 22 February 2011. To date there have been about 165 confirmed dead but there are more bodies still trapped in the rubble of collapsed buildings. Three versions of this cartoon are available Quantity: 3 digital cartoon(s).

Research papers, Lincoln University

The 48hr Design Challenge, run by the Christchurch City Council and held at Lincoln University, provided an opportunity for Council to gain inspiration from the design and architecture industry, while testing the draft Central City Plan currently being developed. The Challenge was a response to the recent earthquakes in Christchurch and brought together local and international talent. A total of 15 teams took part in the Challenge, with seven people in each including engineers, planners, urban designers, architects and landscape architects, as well as one student on each team. The four sites within the Red Zone included the Cathedral Square and BNZ Building; 160 Gloucester Street; the Orion NZ Building at 203 Gloucester Street; and 90 Armagh Street, including the Avon River and Victoria Square. The fifth site, which sits outside the Red Zone, is the former Christchurch Women’s Hospital at 885 Colombo Street. This is team SoLA's entry for 160 Gloucester Street.

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

Text above the image reads 'Time capsule discovered under founder's statue-' The statue of John Robert Godley, the founder of Christchurch, has toppled and a time capsule has been uncovered in the rubble by three rescue workers. One of them reads the document he has pulled out of the capsule and it says 'Personally I favoured Akaroa...' Context - the Christchurch earthquake of 22 February 2011 after which 2 time capsules were found under the John Robert Godfrey statue - they have been sent to Museum experts to open. Akaroa was largely unaffected by the earthquake. A Nelson newspaper 'The Colonist' in an article published in 1918 about the time capsule in Christchurch said, "This statute of John Robert Godley executed by Thomas Woolner was erected in the west side of the Cathedral Square by the Provincial Government of Canterbury, and unveiled by the late Sir Charles Christopher Bowen on August 6 1867, it was moved to this site in March 1918." (3 News 2 March 2011) Colour and black and white versions available Quantity: 2 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

Prime Minister John Key drives a tractor to which is attached a crane and a huge demolition ball in the shape of MP Gerry Brownlee's head; the ball smashes against a historic building bringing stone pediments down. Context - Gerry Brownlee, who is Earthquake Recovery Minister, has caused a stir by suggesting that if he had his way some of Christchurch's older buildings would be "down tomorrow". He also said the price of saving some historic buildings badly damaged in the February 22 earthquake was too high. People had died in the quake because of attempts to save historic buildings badly damaged in the September 4 quake. Brownlee said he had no regrets despite the stir his comments caused - but he was annoyed by suggestions the Cathedral and Riccarton House were among buildings he thought should be bowled. He believed those buildings should be saved, and they would be. "I'm not a philistine; I was chairman of the trust that actually saved Riccarton House from the bulldozers in 1990. "I understand conservation architecture very well and I do have an appreciation of heritage buildings." Original cartoon held at A-474-048 Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

The cartoon shows a monstrous machine with an enormous crushing ball attached to a giant crane. It moves past a signpost that points towards Christchurch. A man watches and tells his friend 'Gerry Brownlee borrowed it from Auckland! Context - Brownlee has caused a stir by suggesting that if he had his way some of Christchurch's older buildings would be "down tomorrow". He also said the price of saving some historic buildings badly damaged in the February 22 earthquake was too high. People had died in the quake because of attempts to save historic buildings badly damaged in the September 4 quake. Brownlee said he had no regrets despite the stir his comments caused - but he was annoyed by suggestions the Cathedral and Riccarton House were among buildings he thought should be bowled. He believed those buildings should be saved, and they would be. "I'm not a philistine; I was chairman of the trust that actually saved Riccarton House from the bulldozers in 1990. "I understand conservation architecture very well and I do have an appreciation of heritage buildings." Colour and black and white versions available Quantity: 2 digital cartoon(s).

Audio, Radio New Zealand

TODD McCLAY to the Minister of Finance: What reports has he received on progress in building a faster-growing economy? GRANT ROBERTSON to the Prime Minister: Does he have confidence in his Ministers; if so, why? Dr PAUL HUTCHISON to the Minister of Health: What progress can he report on the numbers of patients receiving elective surgery? JACINDA ARDERN to the Minister for Social Development: Does she stand by her answer to oral questions on Tuesday that "There is in New Zealand no actual poverty line" and "I do not see the measurement as a priority"? Dr RUSSEL NORMAN to the Prime Minister: Does he agree with the statement made by the Hon Bill English, in relation to the release of Natasha Fuller's private details by his Social Development Minister, that, "People who enter into public debate are welcome to do so … and should provide their full information to the public"? CHRIS AUCHINVOLE to the Minister of Broadcasting: What percentage of households in Hawkes Bay and on the West Coast of the South Island have gone digital ahead of the digital switchover in these regions on 30 September? CHARLES CHAUVEL to the Minister of Justice: What assistance will be available to families unable to afford the fee of over $900 she proposes to introduce in order to access the new Family Dispute Resolution Service? JOHN HAYES to the Minister for Courts: In light of the opening of the temporary courthouse in Masterton last week, what is the range of services that courts can now offer in Masterton? DENIS O'ROURKE to the Minister for Canterbury Earthquake Recovery: Was restoration of the Christchurch Cathedral included in the Christchurch Central City Recovery Plan; if not, why not? SUE MORONEY to the Minister of Women's Affairs: Is she satisfied with the action this Government has taken to improve the lives of women in New Zealand? JAN LOGIE to the Minister for Social Development: Is she concerned that Wellington Rape Crisis is shutting its doors one day a week because of funding shortfalls? IAIN LEES-GALLOWAY to the Minister of Transport: Which commuter rail services, if any, do not receive funding from the New Zealand Transport Agency?

Audio, Radio New Zealand

There have been dramatic scenes at the America's cup in Bermuda with Team New Zealand capsizing at the start of its second race of the day against the Bristish team Ben Ainslie Racing. Our America's Cup correspondent Todd Niall was at the Team New Zealand base. Transport Minister Simon Bridges has been caught trying to block an Official Information request for details about a proposed new 50 million dollar Auckland railway line. Kiwirail argued it was legally required to release the information, but the idea of releasing that information was making Mr Bridges 'extremely uncomfortable.' A man believed to be an Algerian student has attacked a police officer with a hammer outside Notre-Dame Cathedral in Paris. Our correspondent Peter Allen says there is still a heavy police presence. The Labour Party says the government is short changing the health sector to the tune of $2.3 billion. The party's leader Andrew Little says funding hasn't kept up with the growing population and changing demographic. The United States secretary of state Rex Tillerson used a fleeting visit to Wellington yesterday to emphasise the importance of the Asia Pacific region and denying the US is stepping back from involvement here. Foreign affairs minister Gerry Brownlee says the US pulling out of the TPP doesn't prove anything. The immediate aftermath of the devastating 2011 Christchurch earthquake and its ongoing impact on residents' mental health is being described as a recovery of two halves. The latest wellbeing survey from the Canterbury District Health Board shows that one in five people, predominantly those living in the eastern suburbs, say they experience stress most or all of the time. Nicky Wagner, the Minister supporting Greater Christchurch Regeneration, says the city has a good quality of life when compared to the rest of the country, despite a new survey showing one in five people say they experience stress most or all of the time. Ms Wagner, says 82 per cent have a good or very good quality of life in Christchurch, which compares with 81 percent nationwide. She says the east side of the city is very low lying and suffered the most damage and work is still being down in that area.

Research papers, Victoria University of Wellington

Architecture and music have a long intertwining history.These respective creative forces many times have collaborated into monumental place, harboured rich occasion, been catalyst for cultural movement and defined generations. Together they transcend their respective identities. From dinky local church to monstrous national stadia, together they are an intense concentration, a powerfully addictive dosage where architecture is the place, music is the faith, and people are the reason.  Music is a programme that architecture often celebrates in poetic and grand fashion; a superficial excuse to symbolise their creative parallels. But their relationship is much richer and holds more value than just the opportunity to attempt architectural metaphor.While music will always overshadow the architecture in the sense of a singular event, architecture is like the soundman behind the mixing desk. It’s not the star front and centre grabbing your attention, but is responsible for framing the star. It is the foundational backdrop, a critical pillar. Great architecture can help make great music. In this sense music is a communication of architecture, it is the ultimate creative function.  Christchurch, New Zealand, is a city whose story changed in an instant. The seismic events of 2010 and 2011 have become the overriding subject of its historical narrative, as it will be for years to come. Disaster redefines place (the town of Napier, struck by an earthquake in 1931, exemplifies this). There is no quantifiable justification for an exploration of architecture and music within the context of Christchurch. The Town Hall, one of New Zealand’s most architecturally significant buildings, is under repair. The Christ Church Cathedral will more than likely be rebuilt to some degree of its former self. But these are echoes of the city that Christchurch was.They are saved because they are artefact. Evidence of history.This thesis makes the argument for the new, the better than before, and for the making of opportunity from disaster, by proposing a ‘new’ town hall, conceived from the sound of old.