Search

found 28 results

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

Christ Church Cathedral, Christchurch, with spire being rebuilt after the 1901 earthquake. Photographer unidentified. The nave, tower and spire of Christchurch Cathedral was completed in 1881. Work on completeing the rest of the building began in 1900. In 1902 the transcepts were finished and work started on the chancel and apse. An earthquake in 1901 cracked the upper part of the spire in two places. In this photograph which dates from late 1902/1903 (see scaffolding beyond the transcept indicating work on chancel) the upper part of the spire has been removed by Messrs Graham and Greig in preparation for replacing this section with a copper covered wooden structure. The Cathedral was completed in 1904. (Information from "Vision and Reality; Christchurch Cathedral in the Square," Colin Brown, Christchurch, 2000 and "A Dream of Spires," Ian Lochhead, Canterbury University Press, 1999, page 153.) Preparation for erecting the scaffolding was reported in the Christchurch Star 15 January 1902. The cross was replaced on the top of the new copper covered wooden section of the spire on 29 June 1903. Source of descriptive information - Notes on file print. Source of title - Title supplied by Library Quantity: 1 b&w original negative(s). Physical Description: Glass negative

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

Shows Bishop Victoria Matthews reading a brochure offering cheap deals for cathedrals and their various accoutrements. Context: refers to the debate about the fate of the Christchurch Cathedral. Bishop Victoria Matthews is in favour of demolishing the cathedral to a certain safe level. The lobby for saving the cathedral, wrecked by the earthquakes of 2010 and 2011, is very strong. Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

Text above reads 'Cathedral rebuild?... The cartoon shows the Christchurch Cathedral as a bouncy cathedral full of jumping children. Context - Debate about the rebuilding of the cathedral after it was severely damaged in the Christchurch earthquakes of 2010 and 2011. There is a strong view that it needs to remain an icon at the heart of the city. It may have to be brought down completely as engineers consider the future for the iconic building. Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

The title is 'Cardboard cathedral proposed...' The cartoon shows the Christchurch Cathedral completed with cardboard boxes and a spire made of used toilet rolls. A puppy is in the process of unwinding toilet paper from the last roll. On an earlier part of the roof stand cardboard cutouts of the Christchurch wizard and maybe the mayor, Bob Parker. Context: A design for a temporary cathedral has been outlined by renowned Japanese architect Shigeru Ban. The proposed $4 million temporary replacement for Christchurch's destroyed cathedral made of shipping containers and cardboard has been met with scepticism from residents of the quake-hit city who wonder whether another church is really what the city needs right now. (3 News 1 August 2011) Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

Shows Christchurch's Anglican cathedral receiving extensive treatment including blood, ambulances, scaffold and signs reading 'save!' In the background Christchurch's Catholic Cathedral says it wants its share of attention as well. Context: The focus of repairing the Christchurch Anglican cathedral appeared to draw focus and resources from the equally historic and damaged Catholic Cathedral. Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

Shows a sick and damaged Christchurch Anglican Cathedral in a hospital bed with two attendants. The Cathedral asks 'Can ya just pull the plug and let me die peacefully?'. Context refers to recent comments by Bishop Victoria Matthews that the Christchurch Cathedral is 'being left to die with no dignity' because of ongoing legal battles about its future. There has been ongoing debate and controversy over whether the Cathedral should be demolished, reconstructed or restored following damage suffered in the February 2011 Earthquake. Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

Cartoon drawn in the style of a pen and ink drawing of the broken Christchurch Cathedral. One version has 'RIP' printed above the non-existant spire and the second has 'RIP' and the words 'Rest in Pieces'. A decision has been made to demolish the cathedral which was severely damaged by the earthquakes of 2010 and 2011. Two versions of this cartoon are available Title from file name Quantity: 2 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

Shows a carcass that represents the Christchurch Cathedral with many people rushing to try to save it from demolition. Context: the extremely controversial debate about whether the Christchurch Cathedral which was severely damaged in the earthquakes, should be demolished, rebuilt on the same site in the same style or partially demolished and made into a memorial. Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

Christchurch City Councillor Aaron Keown has brought a building down on top of himself by hammering it with a mallet in his attempt to chain himself to it. Context: Refers to the start of the demolition of the Christchurch Cathedral in the wake of the earthquakes of 2010 and 2011. Aaron Keown has said he will chain himself to the cathedral to stop it being demolished. Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

The cartoon shows Christchurch Cathedral shattered and with its steeple gone after the earthquake on 22 February 2011. The words 'The oSCARs' (wordplay on 'Oscars' and 'scars') are in the top left corner and the text 'The worst picture' are in the centre. A second version shows an 'Oscar' statuette with a crown on its head. Context - The Christchurch earthquake 22 February 2011 and the 2011 Oscars - annual film awards. Two versions of this cartoon are available Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

Refers to the controversy over the decision to demolish the Christchurch Cathedral which was severely damaged in the earthquakes of 2010 and 2011. The Anglican Bishop of Christchurch Victoria Mathews says the decision to demolish the cathedral was reached through prayer, great deliberation and with the utmost concern for safety. The Bishop says a number of options were considered before deciding to bring the walls down but the turning point was 23 December 2011, when a series of strong quakes rocked the city. At that stage the Canterbury Earthquake Authority approached the church. "CERA told us that our plans for making safe and retrieving, and then stepping back and making further decisions were no longer adequate." Christchurch City council announced their support on Twitter this afternoon (17 May 2012) - tweeting an endorsement to an immediate pause on demolition of the Cathedral to enable deeper and more open consideration of options. Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

The cartoon shows the Christchurch Anglican Cathedral tower in ruins and without its steeple. Above the drawing is the date '22.2.11'. A second version shows a huge magnitude 6.3 earthquake tremor on a seismic graph on top of which is the date '22.2.11'. Context - On 22 February 2011 at 12:51 pm (NZDT), Christchurch experienced a major magnitude 6.3 earthquake, which resulted in severe damage and many casualties. A National State of Emergency has been declared. The cathedral tower has collapsed and there has been devastating damage to the remaining structure. The Cathedral is one of around six sites of extreme concern around the city where many are believed to still be trapped. This earthquake followed on from an original magnitude 7.1 earthquake on 4 September 2010 which did far less damage and in which no-one died. Two versions of this cartoon are available Quantity: 2 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

The cartoon depicts a rose window set in a stone wall. The glass circles each contain a dollar sign. Refers to the future of the Christchurch Cathedral after the Canterbury earthquakes of 2010 and 2011. The Anglican Church seemed to only consider the money in arguing that it would be too expensive to be repaired or rebuilt. Title from file name Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

A woman in a burqa walks out of the 'Church of the Multi-denominations'. The church has a steeple and an onion dome. Context: The cartoonist says that the cartoon was drawn for a satirical piece about the rebuilding of Christchurch. Because of the number of churches damaged, including the Anglican cathedral, The cartoon suggests that there should just build one massive church on the AMI stadium site that all religions can use on their particular day....spires would be raised and lowered etc. Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

Shows John Key phoning Canterbury Earthquake Recovery Minister Gerry Brownlee during his recent visit to China. Key tells Gerry he has found an architect friend in China who can design the new Christchurch Cathedral. Wider context refers to the debate over the 3 plans recently released for the Cathedral, but also refers to media debate concerning Key's involvement in instances of preferential appointments - in particular, his claim to have forgotten a phone call to his friend Ian Fletcher in which Key suggested Fletcher should apply to become director of the Government Communications Security Bureau. See Stuff, 3 April 2013. Colour and black and white versions available Quantity: 2 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

Shows Property Investor Bob Jones with a shotgun on top of Christchurch cathedral on an island surrounded by ducks. The lake is labelled 'Lake Bob Parker'. Context: Bob Jones suggested the Christchurch CBD be replaced with a lake (The Listener 12-18 May 2012). Colour and black and white versions available Quantity: 2 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

Text above the image reads 'Time capsules unearthed in Christchurch' A man reads a newspaper which says 'Petrol is so cheap you can actually afford to run one of these new-fangled motor cars...' Context - when a bronze statue of Christchurch founder John Robert Godley, which stood in Cathedral Square, toppled during the Christchurch earthquake of 22 February 2011, a crane driver clearing rubble discovered two time capsules. One is a small glass capsule with a hand-written letter on gold parchment inside, while the other is a large metal-like object, yet to be opened. A Nelson newspaper 'The Colonist' in an article published in 1918, about the time capsule in Christchurch said, "This statute of John Robert Godley executed by Thomas Woolner was erected in the west side of the Cathedral Square by the Provincial Government of Canterbury, and unveiled by the late Sir Charles Christopher Bowen on August 6 1867, it was moved to this site in March 1918." The man in the cartoon reads a bout the cost of petrol being incredibly cheap and thinks it refers to today's prices. Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

The title reads 'Greener square for Christchurch?..' The cartoon depicts the city centre in Christchurch entirely covered with green and there are cows wandering by the stream as well as grazing on the tops of buildings. A man at the top of the green cathedral says 'I can see it really growing on me!' Context: This is a reference to the draft Central City plan under which the Central City will be greener and more attractive. Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

A man with his arm around his wife and baby stands on a heap of rubble with a spade in his other hand. In the background are the Christchurch Cathedral and several other badly damaged buildings and a signpost reading 'Christchurch' lies on top of the rubble. Text reads 'Buildings may fall but the Kiwi spirit and compassion for our neighbours will never be crushed...' There are two versions of the cartoon, one in colour and one black and white. Refers to the Christchurch earthquake of 4th September 2010. Quantity: 2 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

The cartoon, which looks like a woodcut depicts a muscled workman wearing a black singlet; his arms are folded and the fingers of one hand are crossed. On his arms are tattoos of a helmet and pick, a '$' symbol, a petrol pump, and a high magnitude earthquake graph. Behind him are buildings, including the Christchurch Cathedral, damaged following the Christchurch earthquake of 22 February 2011. Below the cartoon are the words 'Apologies to Nigel Brown' - a black singlet is a recurring motif in the work of New Zealand artist Nigel Brown. Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

The cartoon shows the word 'survivors' in very large print which fades out towards the end of the word. A second version is the same as the first but has the text 'Search called off' in the top left corner. A third version shows the word 'survivors' against a background of the ruined Christchurch Cathedral. Context - The moment when it was realized that no more people could have survived the Christchurch of 22 February 2011. To date there have been about 165 confirmed dead but there are more bodies still trapped in the rubble of collapsed buildings. Three versions of this cartoon are available Quantity: 3 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

Text above the image reads 'Time capsule discovered under founder's statue-' The statue of John Robert Godley, the founder of Christchurch, has toppled and a time capsule has been uncovered in the rubble by three rescue workers. One of them reads the document he has pulled out of the capsule and it says 'Personally I favoured Akaroa...' Context - the Christchurch earthquake of 22 February 2011 after which 2 time capsules were found under the John Robert Godfrey statue - they have been sent to Museum experts to open. Akaroa was largely unaffected by the earthquake. A Nelson newspaper 'The Colonist' in an article published in 1918 about the time capsule in Christchurch said, "This statute of John Robert Godley executed by Thomas Woolner was erected in the west side of the Cathedral Square by the Provincial Government of Canterbury, and unveiled by the late Sir Charles Christopher Bowen on August 6 1867, it was moved to this site in March 1918." (3 News 2 March 2011) Colour and black and white versions available Quantity: 2 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

The cartoon shows a monstrous machine with an enormous crushing ball attached to a giant crane. It moves past a signpost that points towards Christchurch. A man watches and tells his friend 'Gerry Brownlee borrowed it from Auckland! Context - Brownlee has caused a stir by suggesting that if he had his way some of Christchurch's older buildings would be "down tomorrow". He also said the price of saving some historic buildings badly damaged in the February 22 earthquake was too high. People had died in the quake because of attempts to save historic buildings badly damaged in the September 4 quake. Brownlee said he had no regrets despite the stir his comments caused - but he was annoyed by suggestions the Cathedral and Riccarton House were among buildings he thought should be bowled. He believed those buildings should be saved, and they would be. "I'm not a philistine; I was chairman of the trust that actually saved Riccarton House from the bulldozers in 1990. "I understand conservation architecture very well and I do have an appreciation of heritage buildings." Colour and black and white versions available Quantity: 2 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

Prime Minister John Key drives a tractor to which is attached a crane and a huge demolition ball in the shape of MP Gerry Brownlee's head; the ball smashes against a historic building bringing stone pediments down. Context - Gerry Brownlee, who is Earthquake Recovery Minister, has caused a stir by suggesting that if he had his way some of Christchurch's older buildings would be "down tomorrow". He also said the price of saving some historic buildings badly damaged in the February 22 earthquake was too high. People had died in the quake because of attempts to save historic buildings badly damaged in the September 4 quake. Brownlee said he had no regrets despite the stir his comments caused - but he was annoyed by suggestions the Cathedral and Riccarton House were among buildings he thought should be bowled. He believed those buildings should be saved, and they would be. "I'm not a philistine; I was chairman of the trust that actually saved Riccarton House from the bulldozers in 1990. "I understand conservation architecture very well and I do have an appreciation of heritage buildings." Original cartoon held at A-474-048 Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).