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Audio, Radio New Zealand

Little is known about The Wizard of New Zealand who took centre stage in Christchurch's Cathedral Square from the 70s until the Christchurch earthquakes in 2011, which saw the city in a state of disrepair. A man who challenged political, social and cultural ideology, The Wizard posed provocative questions in this public space, much to the delight, and sometimes dismay, of passersby. But the background to why The Wizard was there in the first place has been something of a mystery... until now. Sonia Yee finds out more in this episode of Eyewitness.

Audio, Radio New Zealand

Sir Richard Hadlee is seeking public support to fund the final 1.6 million dollars needed to open an indoor training facility that will bear his name in Christchurch's Hagley Park. The multipurpose venue will cost close to 5 million to construct. It will be the first indoor cricket training facility in the city since the earthquakes, and Sir Richard hopes that it will be open in 100 days time - for the start of next year's women's cricket World Cup. Hadlee, who was diagnosed with Colorectal cancer in 2018, told Felicity Reid it's a project that he's proud to be involved in. And he's also got a few thoughts on how the Black Caps will fare in India when the first Test starts tomorrow.

Articles, UC QuakeStudies

A fixed-text PDF copy of Juliet Nicholas and Fiona Farrell's book, We Lived Here: Six stories from the Avon Loop. Interviews collected and edited by Fiona Farrell. Photographs by Juliet Nicholas.

Other, UC QuakeStudies

A zip file containing an EPUB of Juliet Nicholas and Fiona Farrell's book, We Lived Here: Six stories from the Avon Loop. Interviews collected and edited by Fiona Farrell. Photographs by Juliet Nicholas.

Images, UC QuakeStudies

A scanned copy of a photograph of the garden of Di Madgin's former home in the Red Zone, taken before the earthquakes. She describes the scene in the photograph as, "This is the courtyard that we made, to have an eating place at the back of the house. The tree in the neighbours' was a tree that Pete's brother stole on a school trip up in the mountains from a national park. They planted this red beech in the garden. It became the neighbourhood bird tree and the sound was fantastic in the evenings."

Audio, Radio New Zealand

New Zealanders are paying too much for house and contents insurance, according to a new survey. Consumer NZ's price comparison survey shows climate and natural hazard risk is being factored in, and is more expensive than ever. Quotes for a large house differed by more than $3,000 across Auckland, Hamilton, Wellington, Christchurch, and Dunedin, and there's a more than $2,000 difference between the cheapest and most expensive policies on offer for a standard-sized house. If you live somewhere with a higher chance of earthquakes - such as Wellington or Christchurch - you'll be charged more for insurance. The cost of house and contents insurance has risen by 5.6% this year, over the past ten years it's gone up 150%. Kathryn is joined by Consumer NZ's Gemma Rasmussen and Katrina Shanks Chief Executive of Financial Advice New Zealand, which represents independent and professional financial advisors.

Videos, UC QuakeStudies

A video contributed by Hugh, a participant in the Understanding Place research project. The video has the description "Hugh talks about the damage his old house received during the earthquake and also the New Brighton area".

Images, UC QuakeStudies

A photograph contributed by Jennifer, a participant in the Understanding Place research project. The photograph has the description "The ground is covered in little mushrooms when you start looking, but it's hard to tell which are edible". Please note that Jennifer's Red Zone Story was a test-pilot for the Understanding Place project.