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Audio, Radio New Zealand

The Christchurch earthquakes caused devastating damage to many of the city’s creative spaces. But rising from the rubble has been the Isaac Theatre Royal under the watchful eye of Neil Cox. He’s directed the resurrection of one of  the premiere performance spaces in the country.

Audio, Radio New Zealand

Anna Leask has worked for the New Zealand Herald since 2008 and is currently a senior reporter, covering crime and justice for the daily newspaper as well as for the Weekend Herald and Herald on Sunday. Notably she's reported on the re-investigation of Arthur Allan Thomas, 43 years after the double murders for which he served nine years in prison before being pardoned, and the Christchurch 'House of Horrors' murderer Jason Somerville, who killed his wife and buried her under his East Christchurch house a year after doing the same to his neighbour Tisha Lowery. Leask covered the Pike River Mine disaster in 2010, the 2011 Canterbury earthquakes, Fiji's Cyclone Winston in early 2016 and travelled to Gallipoli in 2015 to cover the centenary of the Anzac landings. She won a Canon Media Award for crime and justice reporting in 2014. Her first book, Behind Bars: Real-life stories from inside New Zealand prisons has just been released.

Audio, Radio New Zealand

It's been a long, long wait but Christchurch's Arts Centre finally has a contemporary art gallery space again - and it's just opened. It's the latest 'reveal' in the Arts Centre post-earthquake rebuild. The new gallery's called The Central and is housed in the original Canterbury College Library. Four Christchurch families and gallerist Jonathan Smart have made it happen and artists including local sculptor Neil Dawson, photographer Peter Peryer, glitter specialist Reuben Patterson and painter Dick Frizzell are in the mix for the opening group show. There are some new names there too. Lynn Freeman speaks to The Central's Jonathan Smart and Ngai Tahu artist Lonnie Hutchinson who has work in the opening show.

Audio, Radio New Zealand

Lyttelton was hit harder than most by the Christchurch earthquakes - particularly the Lyttelton Museum. But now it's back - triumphantly, we may say! - with a little help from its friends, past and present. Key historical figures in Lyttelton's history are brought back to life in a new exhibition by Julia Holden - Lyttelton Redux - which has just opened at Canterbury Museum.

Audio, Radio New Zealand

Over the summer on The Weekend we've been talking to recyclers and upcyclers, people who like the Wombles, are making good use of the things that they find, things that the everyday folks leave behind. This is true of Christchurch builder, artist and furniture maker, Tim McGurk. He says he works with whatever junk and materials he can find. Tim crafted several items from the materials salvaged from an earthquake damaged Christchurch house, as part of the Whole House Reuse project. He also made the news when he made a Star Wars inspired X-wing sculpture/lamp out of salvaged rimu.

Audio, Radio New Zealand

Christchurch remembers six years on from the deadly earthquake. What panelists Ali Jones and James Nokise have been up to. John Gray from the Home Owners and Buyers Association believes the mayor is getting advice from self interest groups looking to shift the focus from their own shortcomings. Police in Hawkes Bay discovered 300 stolen garden gnomes with a growing trend to sell them on to fund meth purchases. Pie eating goalie in the UK has resigned for taking part in the bet that he would eat a pie during his team's match.

Audio, Radio New Zealand

Conservationist, forager, angler and former fisheries observer Peter Langlands talks about the many threats to our lakes and waterways. Lynn Freeman asked the Cantabrian how the earthquakes affected Christchurch birds, as there was talk that they left the city.

Audio, Radio New Zealand

There's been widespread dismay at the decision not to prosecute anyone for the deaths of 115 people in the CTV building collapse during the 2011 Canterbury earthquake. Police say it was a tough decision - they wanted to hold someone to account but there simply wasn't the evidence to warrant a prosecution.

Audio, Radio New Zealand

The Christchurch City Council has confirmed the demolition of the earthquake-damaged Lancaster Park sports stadium will begin this year. Lancaster Park Cricket club was one of the sports ground's first tenants when it was established in 1881. An act of parliament means the ground has to be used for sport and recreation. "We're certainly looking foward to being able to get back on the ground and for it to be turned back into green space," Ric Horsfall from the cricket club says.

Audio, Radio New Zealand

After the magnitude 7.1 earthquake struck Canterbury on 4 September 2010, most media reports claimed that no lives had been lost. But In fact, this first earthquake killed at least 3000 chickens, eight cows, one dog, a lemur and 150 aquarium fish. University of Canterbury associate professor Annie Potts, along with co-author Donelle Gadenne, wrote Animals in Emergencies: Learning from the Christchurch Earthquakes, revealing what happened to the animals during and after the series of quakes. Annie Potts will give a public lecture, 'Animals and natural disasters: Learning from recent earthquakes', on Thursday 16 March, 7pm at UC Ilam campus, Christchurch. Register to attend free at: www.canterbury.ac.nz/ucconnect