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Videos, UC QuakeStudies

A video of a tour of the new central Christchurch police station. The video includes interviews with Riwai Grace, Fire Communications Shift Manager at the New Zealand Fire Service, and Superintendent Gary Knowles, Canterbury Area Commander for the New Zealand Police. Knowles gives The Press a tour of the new training area, cafeteria, courtyard, firearm simulator room, prosecution area, interview rooms, and cell blocks.

Research papers, University of Canterbury Library

On Tuesday 22 February 2011, a 6.3 magnitude earthquake struck Christchurch, New Zealand’s second largest city. The ‘earthquake’ was in fact an aftershock to an earlier 7.1 magnitude earthquake that had occurred on Saturday 4 September 2010. There were a number of key differences between the two events that meant they had dramatically different results for Christchurch and its inhabitants. The 22 February 2011 event resulted in one of New Zealand’s worst natural disasters on record, with 185 fatalities occurring and hundreds more being injured. In addition, a large number of buildings either collapsed or were damaged to the point where they needed to be totally demolished. Since the initial earthquake in September 2010, a large amount of building-related research has been initiated in New Zealand to investigate the impact of the series of seismic events – the major focus of these research projects has been on seismic, structural and geotechnical engineering matters. One project, however, conducted jointly by the University of Canterbury, the Fire Protection Association of New Zealand and BRANZ, has focused on the performance of fire protection systems in the earthquakes and the effectiveness of the systems in the event of post-earthquake fires occurring. Fortunately, very few fires actually broke out following the series of earthquake events in Christchurch, but fire after earthquakes still has significant implications for the built environment in New Zealand, and the collaborative research has provided some invaluable insight into the potential threat posed by post-earthquake fires in buildings. As well as summarising the damage caused to fire protection systems, this paper discusses the flow-on effect for designing structures to withstand post-earthquake fires. One of the underlying issues that will be explored is the existing regulatory framework in New Zealand whereby structural earthquake design and structural design for fire are treated as discrete design scenarios.

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

The cartoon shows the word 'Christchurch' fractured by earthquake. Text above reads 'The new tear(s)'. A second version has the text in the singular 'The new tear'. Context: In spite of Christchurch's great hopes for a new year without earthquakes, there have been numerous quakes and aftershocks. A wordplay on 'new year' and 'new tear' - that is weeping with fear and dismay. Two versions of this cartoon are available Quantity: 2 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

Under the caption, young people carrying their baggage flutter into the air, away from Canterbury and toward 'Oz'. In September GNS Earth Sciences reported that after the earthquakes, the Greendale and associated faults were still moving as they settled into a new configuration. At the same time the young were leaving Canterbury (and New Zealand) for a better future in Australia. The population of New Zealand was moving into a new configuration. Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Videos, UC QuakeStudies

A video about the restoration of New Regent Street. New Regent Street was damaged during the 22 February 2011 earthquake. The video includes an interview with Edward Leeson, manager of the restoration project.

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

Four cartoons in the same frame commenting on news and happenings in the week ending 15 December 2011. The cartoons refer to the expulsion of the controversial Member of Parliament, Brendan Horan, from the New Zealand First Party by its leader, Winston Peters; the stereotyping of New Zealand as being 'Middle Earth' following the filming of 'The Hobbit', punned as 'The Habbit'; the lax attitude to building design and standards, which led to the CTV Building disaster in the Christchurch earthquake; the news about the New Zealand SPCA teaching dogs to drive. Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).