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Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

Several 'quake victims' dive into a fissure and zip it up as Santa Claus in the form of a malignant '$' symbol leaps towards them yelling 'Ho! Ho! Ho!' One of the quake victims shouts 'Quick Hide! Christmas is getting closer!!' Context; the Christchurch earthquake on 4th September and all the subsequent aftershocks have cost many people a great deal of money. Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Audio, Radio New Zealand

The family of a Christchurch earthquake victim wants the Royal Commission to investigate all Search and Rescue efforts during the disaster. The Government faces a higher-than-forecast Budget deficit.

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

Photographs of people gathered in the grounds of Parliament on 1 March 2011 to observe two minutes silence to remember the people killed in the Christchurch earthquake on 22 February 2011. Arrangement: Images were originally in a folder labelled '2 Minutes Silence for Christchurch Earthquake Mar 1 2011' within the folder '300111 Fairs, Festivals & Protests Jan to July 2011' Quantity: 15 digital photograph(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

The title is 'Gerry BrownLie?' and the cartoon shows the Minister for Earthquake recovery, Gerry Brownlee, saying 'It was NOT a lie. It was a false promise'. Context: Earthquake Minister Gerry Brownlee has apologised for falsely promising red zone homeowners they would be paid out for improvements to their house. Brownlee promised in June that, in some cases, home improvements like new kitchens would be included in the government settlement offer for red zone houses. But the offer is only valid if the improvement has added to the footprint of the house. (Press - 4 September 2011) Alternate version of DCDL-0018758 Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Research papers, Lincoln University

Memorial design in the West has been explored in depth (Stevens and Franck, 2016; Williams, 2007), and for landscape architects it presents opportunities and challenges. However, there is little in the English language literature about memorial design in China. How have Chinese designers responded to the commemorative settings of war and disaster? This study will adopt the method of case study to analyse two of the most representative memorials in China: Nanjing Massacre Memorial Hall (war) and Tangshan Earthquake Memorial Hall (disaster). Both landscapes have undergone three or four renovations and extensions in the last four decades, demonstrating the practical effects of the Chinese landscape theory. These examples of responses to trauma through memorial landscape interventions are testimonies to the witnesses, victims, abusers, ordinary people, youth and the place where the tragedy took place. This study will explore the reconstruction and expansion of the two memorials under the background of China's policies on memorial landscapes in different periods, as well as their functions of each stage. The research will examine how existing Chinese memorial theories exhibit unique responses at different times in response to the sadness and needs experienced by different users. Key Words:memorial landscape; memorial language; victims; descriptive; architecture; experence; disaster; memorial hall; landscape development; Chinese memorial; war.

Research papers, University of Canterbury Library

We’ll never know why the thirteen people whose corpses were discovered in Pompeii’s Garden of the Fugitives hadn’t fled the city with the majority of the population when Vesuvius turned deadly in AD79. But surely, thanks to 21st century technology, we know just about everything there is to know about the experiences of the people who went through the Canterbury Earthquakes. Or has the ubiquity of digital technology, combined with seemingly massive online information flows and archives, created a false sense that Canterbury’s earthquake stories, images and media are being secured for posterity? In this paper Paul Millar makes reference to issues experienced while creating the CEISMIC Canterbury Earthquakes Digital Archive (www.ceismic.org.nz) to argue that rather than having preserved all the information needed to fully inform recovery, the record of the Canterbury earthquakes’ impacts, and the subsequent response, is incomplete and unrepresentative. While CEISMIC has collected and curated over a quarter of a million earthquake-related items, Millar is deeply concerned about the material being lost. Like Pompeii, this disaster has its nameless, faceless, silenced victims; people whose stories must be heard, and whose issues must be addressed, if recovery is to be meaningful.

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

Text above reads 'Central Christchurch business owners protest' and the words 'Cordon Blur' (wordplay on famous cookery schools 'Cordon Bleu' and 'blur' as in 'unclear'). The cartoon shows a striped barrier bearing the words 'KEEP OUT' that is being torn to pieces. A second version continues the text to read 'Central Christchurch business owners protest as future directions unclear'. Context - Protests from angry Christchurch business owners locked out of the damaged CBD have intensified today, with police physically intervening when several protesters went inside the cordon. They are worried about the state of their businesses inside the red zone, and say they have not been allowed in to collect critical records and basic tools so they can carry on working outside the cordon. (NZ Herald 21 March 2011) Quantity: 2 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

The cartoon shows the word 'survivors' in very large print which fades out towards the end of the word. A second version is the same as the first but has the text 'Search called off' in the top left corner. A third version shows the word 'survivors' against a background of the ruined Christchurch Cathedral. Context - The moment when it was realized that no more people could have survived the Christchurch of 22 February 2011. To date there have been about 165 confirmed dead but there are more bodies still trapped in the rubble of collapsed buildings. Three versions of this cartoon are available Quantity: 3 digital cartoon(s).

Audio, Radio New Zealand

It's been a year since the police announced new measures to get more women into the force. One of those measures was a reality tv show, "Women In Blue", that followed seven female police officers on the job. Among them was Constable Bridget Suckling, who specialises in disaster victim identification. She juggles major operations such as Pike River and the aftermath of the Christchurch earthquakes with her work on the Auckland Search and rescue squad.She talks to Katy Gosset about why she joined the police and the impact of "Women in Blue".

Research papers, Lincoln University

When a tragedy occurs of local or national scale throughout the world a memorial is often built to remember the victims, and to keep the tragedy fresh in the minds of generations with the conviction that this must not be repeated. Memorials to commemorate natural disasters very to the objective of a human induced tragedy in that future catastrophic events that affect the lives and livelihood of many citizens are sure to reoccur in countries that are geographically pre-disposed to the ravages of nature. This thesis examines memorial sites as case studies in New Zealand and Japan to explore the differences in how these two countries memorialise earthquakes, and tsunamis in the case of Japan, and whether there are lessons that each could learn from each other. In so doing, it draws largely on scholarly literature written about memorials commemorating war as little is written on memorials that respond to natural disasters. Visited case sites in both countries are analysed through multiple qualitative research methods with a broad view of what constitutes a memorial when the landscape is changed by the devastation of a natural disaster. How communities prepare for future events through changes in planning legislation, large scale infrastructure, tourism and preparedness for personal safety are issues addressed from the perspective of landscape architecture through spatial commemorative places. The intentions and meanings of memorials may differ but in the case of a memorial of natural disaster there is a clear message that is common to all. To reduce the severity of the number of deaths and level of destruction, education and preparedness for future events is a key aim of memorials and museums.

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

The title is 'Gerry BrownLie?' and the cartoon shows the Minister for Earthquake recovery, Gerry Brownlee, saying 'I promise not to promise again'. The words 'Red Zone' appear beneath with the word 'faced' inserted between them. Context: The 'Red Zone' is the earthquake area in which houses cannot be rebuilt. Earthquake Minister Gerry Brownlee has apologised for falsely promising red zone homeowners they would be paid out for improvements to their house. Brownlee promised in June that, in some cases, home improvements like new kitchens would be included in the government settlement offer for red zone houses. But the offer is only valid if the improvement has added to the footprint of the house. (Press - 4 September 2011) Alternate version of DCDL-0018757 Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).