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Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

Text at top left reads 'Where earthquakes come from' Below God and the devil stand on either side of a gaming board which shows a map of New Zealand placed on a numbered board. The croupier spins the numbers and says 'Faites vos jeux' while the devil furiously shakes the dice and God makes a peace sign and thinks 'Next move'..' Context - the apparently random nature of when and where earthquakes strike. Because of the Christchurch earthquakes of 4 September 2010 and 22 February 2011 many New Zealanders have been asking for more certainty about earthquake prediction which scientists cannot yet give them. Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

Photographs of people gathered in the grounds of Parliament on 1 March 2011 to observe two minutes silence to remember the people killed in the Christchurch earthquake on 22 February 2011. Arrangement: Images were originally in a folder labelled '2 Minutes Silence for Christchurch Earthquake Mar 1 2011' within the folder '300111 Fairs, Festivals & Protests Jan to July 2011' Quantity: 15 digital photograph(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

A tall building sways and groans, creaks and rumbles during an earthquake. Someone from inside at the top of the building says 'Earthquake? No... This is an extreme adventure activity that you'll be billed for later!' Context - The earthquakes in Christchurch and the Canterbury region. The three major ones were on 4th September 2010, 22 February 2011 and 13 June 2011 and there have been hundreds of aftershocks. Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

The EQC (Earthquake Commission) has developed new standards and designs to help rebuild Christchurch after the earthquakes of 2010 and 2011. The Department of Building and Housing have produced some generic building foundation and floor designs that can be used for residential homes being built or repaired on liquefied, tilting, unsettled and/or damaged land. (RebuildChristchurch.co.nz) Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

The cartoon shows a house for sale in Christchurch after the earthquakes; there is a jagged rip through the house and the road outside that looks like a seismic graph after a lot of activity. The 'For Sale' sign says 'Open Plan living, open home, Seismologist's dream!'. Context - A house wrecked by the Christchurch earthquakes of September 4th 2010, February 22 2011 and June 13 2011. Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

Text reads 'Canterbury lamb...' and the cartoon shows a slavering wolf that represents 'earthquake' dressed in 'lamb's clothing' and prowling in the night among other sheep. Context - The saying 'a wolf in sheep's clothing' that suggests something sinister sheltering behind something benign. Refers to the devastating Christchurch earthquakes of 2010 and 2011. A third very damaging earthquake occured on 13th June 2011. 'Canterbury lamb' is well-known as a favourite meat overseas. Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

Text at the top of the cartoon reads 'NZ city strengthening?' A whole city enclosed in a glass dome and balanced on huge springs intended to make it earthquake resistant rocks as another aftershock hits. Context - Two earthquakes and hundreds of aftershocks have hit Christchurch, the first on 4 September 2010 and a second more devastating one on 22 February 2011. There has been great emphasis on making heritage buildings that are rebuilt and all new buildings earthquake resistant. The example in the cartoon is perhaps a Springs-with-damper base isolator. Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

The cartoon shows a daffodil blooming in an earthquake fissure with the wrecked buildings of Christchurch in the background. Context: September 4th is the anniversary of the first quake. Many people in Christchurch are still living in houses that may yet be red stickered (condemned) and many city buildings are still out of bounds, either condemned to destruction or rebuilt after the earthquakes of September 4th 2010 and February 22nd and June 13th 2011. But the return of spring maybe brings a sense of encouragement and hope. Title provided by librarian Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

A huge fist representing 'quakes', that is wearing a boxing glove, thumps a man who represents 'CHCH' (Christchurch) 'WHUMP! WHUMP! WHUMP!' The man is knocked out. Context - Magnitude 6.0 and 5.5 earthquakes rocked Christchurch again at 1pm and 2.20pm on 13th June 2011. These quakes follow the first earthquake on September 4th 2010 and the second on February 22nd 2011. (www.stuff.co.nz, 13 June 2011) Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

Two people peer out from underneath a table waiting for an earthquake predicted by astrologer Ken Ring. One of them says 'Load of rubbish that Ken Ring prediction eh?' and the other agrees. Context - After the two big earthquakes in Christchurch on 4 September 2010 and 22 February 2011, the so-called Moon Man, Ken Ring, is backing away from his prediction that Christchurch will be whacked by a huge earthquake on the 20th of March 2011. His claims terrified Cantabrians and led to people fleeing Christchurch. Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

Roger Sutton, former chief executive of the the power lines company, Orion and since June 2011 Chief Executive Officer of the Canterbury Earhquake Recovery Authority, is shown in a straitjacket, raving. An unseen interviewer asks him how it feels after 'two years in the job'. Roger Sutton's work in leading the Earthquake Authority after the February earthquake was extremely stressful, considering the magnitude of the task. Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

The cartoon shows one car heading out of Christchurch and another heading into Christchurch. Two roadsigns read 'Earthquake refugees heading out of Christchurch' and 'Motorist refugees heading to Christchurch for cheap petrol'. Context - many people are leaving Christchurch after the 22 February earthquake but others are coming into Christchurch to benefit from cheap fuel. Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

The cartoon depicts a rose window set in a stone wall. The glass circles each contain a dollar sign. Refers to the future of the Christchurch Cathedral after the Canterbury earthquakes of 2010 and 2011. The Anglican Church seemed to only consider the money in arguing that it would be too expensive to be repaired or rebuilt. Title from file name Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

Two huge wrestlers, one representing 'Port Hills fault' and the other 'Greendale fault' struggle together over a broken Christchurch. Another wrestler, representing 'Other faults' appears in the distance yelling 'Is it my turn yet?' Context - Christchurch has now had three major earthquakes and thousands of aftershocks. It now appears likely that the Christchurch quakes resulted from activity on a fault extending directly eastward from the Alpine fault that remained unknown until last year, says Roger Musson, a seismologist at the British Geological Survey in Edinburgh. The new fault first came to light last September (4th) when a stronger but less calamitous quake shook Darfield, 40 kilometres west of Christchurch. Musson says the latest quake (Feb 22, 2011) probably resulted from an eastward continuation of activity on the same fault. "It has probably not moved for tens of thousands of years, so lots of strain built up," says Musson. The third major quake happened on 13th June 2011. (New Scientist - February 22, 2011) Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

Text reads 'Uses for Christchurch rubble?...' The cartoon shows a bridge made partially of earthquake rubble leading from Lyttelton Harbour to Diamond Harbour on Banks Peninsula. Someone in a van says 'At long last... A bridge to Diamond Harbour!' And someone else says 'And somewhere to fish!' Context - Rubble from the earthquake may be used for the construction of watersides and bridges. This cartoon is a fanciful use for Christchurch earthquake rubble. Currently a ferry connects Diamond Harbour to Lyttelton, on the harbour's northern shore. In combination with buses from Lyttelton to downtown Christchurch, this allows residents of Diamond Bay to commute to the city. Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

Shows a throng of sex workers rushing back following the announcement that 'Manchester Street's open!'. Prior to the Christchurch earthquake in February 2011 Manchester Street was the focus of street prostitution. On 13 April 2013 the Canterbury Earthquake Recovery Authority (CERA) announced: 'A temporary change to the cordon tonight sees Manchester Street open all the way through for the first time in over two years'. Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

A man, half shown, sits on a loo and says 'Dang! I'm busting again! as he reaches for the toilet paper which has a different 'quake claim' printed on each section. Context - Magnitude 6.0 and 5.5 earthquakes rocked Christchurch again at 1pm and 2.20pm on 13th June 2011. These quakes follow the first earthquake on September 4th 2010 and the second on February 22nd 2011. (www.stuff.co.nz, 13 June 2011) Each time there is a significant quake more damage is done and so people have to make further insurance claims. Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

Text reads 'New Chch subdivision?...' The cartoon shows a very snowy scene with several igloos; The subdivision is called 'Igloo Park' and the sign says 'Polar packages available'. Context: Christchurch, after being battered by the February 22 earthquake, the June 13 aftershock and last month's snowstorm have had another week of snow. The cartoon suggests that new subdivisions, necessary because of the earthquakes, could be filled with igloos. Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

Text across the top of the cartoon reads 'When the luck ran out' and shows a disintegrating building that includes two dice with a skull and crossbone on one facet. Context - On 22 February 2011 at 12:51 pm (NZDT), Christchurch experienced a major magnitude 6.3 earthquake, which resulted in severe damage and many casualties. A National State of Emergency has been declared. This followed on from an original magnitude 7.1 earthquake on 4 September 2010 which did far less damage and in which no-one died. Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

Two men working on the cleanup after the Christchurch earthquake of 22 February 2011 stop for a chat. One says 'Did I tell you my family was on the first ship!' and the other replies 'Blow that! - I got mine out on the first plane!' Context - the 22 February earthquake in Christchurch. The first man is talking about his ancestors coming to New Zealand in the 1940s and the second man is talking about sending his family out of Christchurch after the earthquake. Colour and black and white versions available Quantity: 2 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

Depicts huge elderly woman with 'CERA' on her dress scolding smaller adult dressed as schoolboy near bustop with sign 'CBD red zone tours' Text reads 'And don't talk to strangers and don't cross the road and remember to eat your lunch..' Context: After the 22 Feburary 2011 earthquake in Christchurch, the central business district (CBD) was marked as a red zone. Red zone areas were deemed unsuitable for habitation due to significant damage and at high risk of further damage from low levels of earth shaking. CERA (Christchurch Earthquake Recovery Authority) ran public bus tours of the Christchurch CBD from November to December 2011. For safety reasons the public was not allowed off the buses as it was a dangerous and active demolition site. Quantity: 1 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

An interested passerby assumes that a builder will be keen to get some EQC work fixing up Christchurch but the builder replies 'Are you kidding?! Not while EQC is paying us $4500 a week to do its assessments!' Context - The Earthquake Commission (EQC) has employed 414 contractors to carry out the assessments on its behalf, Radio New Zealand reported. Contractors carrying out property inspections of quake-damaged Christchurch homes are being paid about $4000 a week. Contractors are paid $75 an hour, while the builders, who inspect the damage, receive $60 an hour, the broadcaster said. (8 June 2011) Colour and black and white versions available Quantity: 2 digital cartoon(s).

Images, Alexander Turnbull Library

In the top frames two children shout 'four point one', 'three point six', and 'five point two' and in the frame below it is seen that they are responding to bumps in the road as their mother drives through Christchurch streets. Context - The children have become expert at guessing the seismic intensity of earthquakes in Christchurch and are now applying them to bumps in the road. Colour and black and white versions available Quantity: 2 digital cartoon(s).